Escape

(The Piña Colada Blog)
[ask] [who]

revnews:

China: Thousands of Yue Yuen (Nike Adidas) Factory Workers Strike Over Unpaid Pensions

http://revolution-news.com/china-thousand-yue-yuen-nike-adidas-factory-workers-strike-unpaid-pensions/

(via anarcho-queer)

http://monetizeyourcat.tumblr.com/post/82936855423/tombomp-ive-posted-this-story-before-but

tombomp:

i’ve posted this story before but Norman Spinrad wrote a quite famous novel called The Iron Dream - it’s basically a pulp sci-fi type story but with the conceit that it was written by an alternate history hitler and it features an introductory essay by a fake academic talking about…

I have read this book. It was a good story as well as good satire, which is an unusual combination.

anarcho-queer:

thinksquad:

Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty
An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed.
http://articles.latimes.com/2014/apr/07/local/la-me-lapd-tamper-20140408

“LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.”

Quis custodiat ipsos custodies? No one, if they get their way.

anarcho-queer:

thinksquad:

Los Angeles police officers tampered with voice recording equipment in dozens of patrol cars in an effort to avoid being monitored while on duty

An inspection by Los Angeles Police Department investigators found about half of the estimated 80 cars in one South L.A. patrol division were missing antennas, which help capture what officers say in the field. The antennas in at least 10 more cars in nearby divisions had also been removed.

http://articles.latimes.com/2014/apr/07/local/la-me-lapd-tamper-20140408

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck and other top officials learned of the problem last summer but chose not to investigate which officers were responsible.

Quis custodiat ipsos custodies? No one, if they get their way.

anarcho-queer:

america-wakiewakie:

Police Are Testing a “Live Google Earth” To Watch Crime As It Happens | Gizmodo

In Compton last year, police began quietly testing a system that allowed them to do something incredible: Watch every car and person in real time as they ebbed and flowed around the city. Every assault, every purse snatched, every car speeding away was on record—all thanks to an Ohio company that monitors cities from the air.

The Center for Investigative Reporting takes a look at a number of emerging surveillance technologies in a new video, but one in particular stands out: A wide-area surveillance system invented by Ross McNutt, a retired Air Force veteran who owns a company called Persistent Surveillance Systems.

McNutt describes his product as “a live version of Google Earth, only with TiVo capabilities,” which is intriguing but vague (and also sounds a lot like the plot of this terrible Denzel movie). More specifically, PSS outfits planes with an array of super high-resolution cameras that allow a pilot to record a 25-square-mile patch of Earth constantly—for up to six hours.

It’s sort of similar to what your average satellite can do—except, in this case, you can rewind the video, zoom in, and follow specific people and cars as they move around the grid. It’s not specific enough to ID people by face, but, when used in unison with stoplight cameras and other on-the-ground video sources, it can identify suspects as they leave the scene of a crime.

The PSS system has been tested in cities including Baltimore and Dayton, and, last year, police officers in Compton used it to track crimes, including a necklace snatching. In one case, they could track a criminal as he approached a woman, grabbed her jewelry, and then ran to a getaway car. They eventually drove out of frame, which meant they weren’t caught—but, as the Compton police explain in this video, the system told them that this particular car was involved, at the very least.

Plenty of critics argue the technology is an ominous invasion of privacy: Video surveillance free of any traditional technological barriers, tracking everyone and everything that moves in a city. But according to police and its creators, it’s not as invasive as other systems, because it can’t see into homes or identify faces. It “allows us to provide more security with less loss of privacy than any of the other options that are out there,” says one officer. That’s definitely one way to look at it. 

Say goodbye to your privacy, this is the imminent future present-day.

How Phoenix Convicted A Transgender Woman For Walking Down The Street

transitiontransmission:

A transgender woman of color named Monica Jones was convicted last week for walking down the street. The charge? “Manifestation of prostitution.” But Jones isn’t a sex worker. She just happens to live in Phoenix, Arizona, where a new tactic to reduce sex work provides new opportunities for police to profile vulnerable populations.

While Jones’ conviction is fully legal in Phoenix, it’s become a rallying cry for trans rights issues, since it so clearly illustrated biases ingrained in the law. Here’s a break down of all the elements that led to Jones’ arrest:

“Manifestation Of Prostitution”

One of the first problems is the incredibly vague way that Phoenix’s law against prostitutionactually defines what constitutes an arrest-worthy offense. In addition to literally offering or soliciting prostitution, the law also enumerates a number of actions that can constitute an “intent” to break the law:

Is in a public place, a place open to public view or in a motor vehicle on a public roadway and manifests an intent to commit or solicit an act of prostitution. Among the circumstances that may be considered in determining whether such an intent is manifested are: that the person repeatedly beckons to, stops or attempts to stop or engage passersby in conversation or repeatedly, stops or attempts to stop, motor vehicle operators by hailing, waiving of arms or any other bodily gesture; that the person inquires whether a potential patron, procurer or prostitute is a police officer or searches for articles that would identify a police officer; or that the person requests the touching or exposure of genitals or female breast.

According to the law, it doesn’t matter if prostitution solicitation actually takes place; simply conveying one of these other actions constitutes a violation of the law. For example, a group of cheerleaders holding a carwash could be arrested under this law for trying to advertise their fundraiser by waving at passing cars.

Additionally, the law dictates that a first offense results in a mandatory minimum of 15 days in jail, up to a maximum of six months, as well as the possibility of a fine up to $2,500. The mandatory minimums increase significantly with each prior charge a person carries. These vague “manifestations” of prostitution thus create opportunity to entrap and punish individuals with prostitution charges even if they are not actually engaging in sex work.

Monica Jones’ Arrest and Conviction

Monica Jones is a student at ASU’s School of Social Work, a sex worker rights advocate with SWOP, and a trans woman of color. When Phoenix police were conducting a Project ROSE sweep in May of 2013, Jones spoke at a community event against the program. The following evening, she was offered a ride home from a bar, only to be not-arrested by the undercover cop, who placed her in handcuffs and drove her to Bethany Bible Church. Jones, however, was not eligible for Project ROSE because of a prior prostitution conviction, despite no longer being a sex worker. Jones was charged with “manifestation of prostitution” and last week, she was convicted and sentenced to 30 days in a men’s prison.

The prosecution’s only witness was the arresting officer, who repeatedly referred to Jones with the male pronouns “he” and “him.” He alleged that she “exposed her breast,” though advocates for Jones suggest her only crime was asking if he was a police officer (knowing full well that Project ROSE sweeps were underway that weekend). The judge deliberated for less than one minute before handing down a guilty verdict. According to the ACLU, which helped represent Jones, the judge’s assumption that the officer’s testimony was credible while hers was hearsay is “erroneous and improper.”

During the time between her arrest and her trial, Jones says she was stopped by police on four more occasions while walking around her neighborhood and threatened with additional “manifestation of prostitution” charges. She explained to the ACLU how “walking while trans” has become a crime in and of itself:

JONES: “Walking while trans” is a saying we use in the trans community to refer to the excessive harassment and targeting that we as trans people experience on a daily basis. “Walking while trans” is a way to talk about the overlapping biases against trans people — trans women specifically — and against sex workers. It’s a known experience in our community of being routinely and regularly harassed and facing the threat of violence or arrest because we are trans and therefore often assumed to be sex workers.

I have been harassed by police four times since my initial arrest last May. The police have stopped me for no real reason when I have been walking to the grocery store, to the local bar, or visiting with a friend on the sidewalk. The police have even threatened me with ‘manifestation with intent to prostitute’ charge, while I was just walking to my local bar!

Police harassment of transgender people is not unusual even absent sex work profiling. According to the National Transgender Discrimination Survey, 29 percent of trans people have experienced police harassment or disrespect. Rates were much higher for people of color. Additionally, 46 percent of trans people report they are generally uncomfortable even seeking police assistance.

Jones has already filed an appeal and is continuing her fight.

(via monetizeyourcat)

And if you feel Japan has ceased to surprise, that you have reached the end of the abnormal in your daily life, here are office ladies dancing the electric slide and slapping leather, here are angry interpretations of ‘Mustang Sally’ to remind you you know nothing.

And then, when you think you’ve plumbed the depths of Japanese strangeness, people start linedancing at your local bar.

nevver:

  Journey to the Center of the Earth

nevver:

Face in the crowd, John Hallmén

stuffandsonenterprises:

Echo & The Bunnymen : Going Up

fidius:

I just woke up from a dream that I achieved nirvana while (by?) reading fantasy novels.

Seriously though. This should’ve been one of those dreams that’s spiritually crushing to wake up from because it was so great, but the residue of the dream feeling is itself a kind of balm. It’s like a cross between opiates and that feeling when you wake up at your usual time on a weekend and realize you can go back to sleep.

I just woke up from a dream that I achieved nirvana while (by?) reading fantasy novels.

Here’s Looking at Euclid: Geometry and Hollywood Films of the 1940s and 50s

Sometimes, I make a slide feel valid by dropping in screenshots of previous slides as ‘illustration of the point being made’. This is down to laziness and disinterest on my part. My presentation becomes a game of presenting some slides, then presenting some conclusions that look as though they are supported by material, when in fact they are merely decorated with what came before them. It’s a bit like the trick of putting your legs in a carrier bag and then lifting yourself up by the bag handles.

Just now, out of laziness and disinterest, I rounded off a conclusion slide by dropping in a screengrab of a previous slide. After lining it all up I realised that the slide I’d used to validate my work was itself a slide that had screengrabs of previous slides.

One of those previous, previous slides had a screen grab of a previous previous previous slide on it.

I can’t go on like this.

—   Messageboard post, Horp (via magnificentruin)

(via magnificentruin)